This is a blog where I mainly re-blog things I like of others. Sometimes, it may be "suggestive", so follow at your own leisure. Talk if you want, I'll respond eventually. I try to make both yours and my life better. Let's see what we can accomplish together.
Reblogged from joshpeck  19,152 notes

unshaped:

"just stop thinking about it"

omg ok thank you so much for your advice why didn’t I just come up WITH THIS PERFECT IDEA LET ME JUST STOP THINKING ABOUT THE THING THAT BUGS ME THE MOST IN MY LIFE OMG THAT IS SO EASY THANK YOU SO FUCKING MUCH FOR MAKING MY LIFE BETTER I WOULD HAVE NEVER THOUGHT ABOUT THIS BY MYSELF

Reblogged from tinkbutts  958 notes

archiemcphee:

11 years ago Japanese artist Ayano Tsukimi returned to her village of Nagoro, a remote little town located in eastern Iya on Shikoku Island, only to discover that it has become a shadow of the place where she grew up. Almost all of the people were gone, having either relocated to bigger cities over the years or simply passed away. Some people might have then left the village themselves, but Ayano - who lives there with her 83-year-old father - instead decided to do something very unusual. She repopulated the village with life-size, handmade dolls, each made in the image of one of the village’s former residents who has either died or moved away.

Over the course of 10 years Ayano has created about 350 dolls. As she makes them she thinks about the people they represent and, once completed, places them around the village in locations they would’ve likely been seen in real life. They sit together on benches, stand on the side of the road, work in the fields, fish from bridges. The now-abandoned school contains students, teachers and a principal. What’s more, Ayano has even made a doll representing herself.

Journalist and photographer Fritz Schumann recently made a short documentary about Ayano Tsukimi entitled The Valley of Dolls.

Visit Oddity Central to learn more about Ayano Tsukimi and her strangely sweet village full of dolls. Then click here to watch Fritz Schymann’s documentary.